How to Prevent Snoring

Chronic snoring affects up to 45% of the adult population. Habitual snorers can be at risk for serious health problems, including obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep apnea creates several problems, including:

– Long interruptions of breathing caused by partial or total obstruction or blockage of the airway
– Frequent waking sleep
– Light sleeping
– Strain of the heart
– Poor night’s sleep


Learning to distinguish between kinds of snoring will help you address the particular causes of that kind of snoring. Closed-mouth snoring indicates that your tongue is the cause of your snoring and that some exercises and lifestyle changes should help eliminate the snoring. Open-mouthed snoring can be caused by sinus trouble or by posture in bed. Snoring from any other position might indicate apnea or other significant issues that will require more substantial medical treatment to address.

It’s important to avoid things that can make snoring worse. Alcohol, sleeping pills, coffee and fatty foods before bedtime can all increase snowing by making your throat muscles relax and narrowing your airway.

Dryness can also cause snoring, so using a humidifier or taking a hot bath or shower before bed can help alleviate snoring as well.

If you sleep on your back, buy yourself a few extra pillows and prop yourself up in bed, rather than lying flat on your back. It is not recommended to sleep on your back because in that position, your tongue and soft palate rest against the back of your throat, blocking the airway.

Remember, snoring is a physical problem. Whether you’re a snorer or live with one, there’s nothing to be embarrassed or angry about. It’s not a conscious choice the snorer is making, but a physical concern that can be remedied with a little planning.