Restless Leg Syndrome

178041620-smallRestless leg syndrome (RLS) is a disorder of the nervous system that involves throbbing, pulling, creeping or other unpleasant sensations in the legs and causes an uncontrollable and overwhelming urge to move them. These feelings occur when the person is resting, mostly in the evenings and during sleep, and will usually go away when people move their legs.

RLS affects people of all ages, most being middle aged. Many pregnant women experience RLS, but it usually goes away after the baby is born. Most people with this disorder have serious sleep problems and are tired and have trouble paying attention.

RLS can be genetic, which is why it tends to run in families. It can also be related to other medical issues which can include kidney disease, low iron levels, anemia, high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes.

Many people with severe cases of RLS get less than five hours of sleep per night which can cause excessive sleepiness during the daytime and affect your personal and professional life.

There are many home remedies you can make that are designed to help combat this problem.

– Walking around may be the only thing that helps RLS. A midnight stroll through the house may calm your legs enough to keep them still when you go back to bed.
– Coffee, tea, chocolate sodas and even over-the-counter (OTC) medications may contain caffeine. Cutting your consumption of these may help improve your condition.
– A warm bath or massage before bed relaxes muscles and therefore may be helpful.
– Try stretching your calves, hamstrings and gluteal muscles before bed.

If you still have twitching legs after you’ve tried these tips, talk to your doctor about getting a medical evaluation.

Sleepwalking

154452003-smallSleepwalking is a sleep disorder that causes people to get up and walk or perform other activities while sleeping. Symptoms of sleepwalking disorder ranges from simply sitting up and looking around, to walking around, to leaving and even driving long distances. It is a common misconception that a sleepwalker should not be awakened. It is not dangerous to wake them up, although it is common for the person to be confused or disoriented for a short period of time after being woken up.

There are several factors that may be involved in the development of sleepwalking that may include genetics, environment and medical conditions.

Sleepwalking occurs more frequently in identical twins and is 190 times more likely to occur if s first-degree relative, such as a parent or sibling, has a history of sleepwalking.

Environmental factors that may cause a person to sleepwalk include: sleep deprivation, stress, alcohol intoxication and drugs such as sedatives, neuroleptics (drugs used to treat psychosis), stimulants and antihistamines.

Medical conditions that have been linked to sleepwalking include: abnormal heart rhythms, fever, nighttime asthma, nighttime seizures and certain psychiatric disorders such a PTSD, panic attacks or multiple personality disorder.

Usually, no exams are tests are necessary for determining whether a person sleepwalks. However a medical evaluation may be completed to rule out any medical causes of sleepwalking.

A person who has a sleepwalking disorder can take these measures of treatment to help prevent any future instances:

– Get adequate sleep
– Meditate or do relaxation exercises
– Avoid any kind of stimuli before bed

Medications for treatment of this disorder may be necessary if there is a high possibility of injury, if the disorder is causing significant disruption to the family and daytime schedule or when all other measures have proven ineffective.