Why We Yawn

Yawning seems like a natural occurrence that only takes place before bed and waking up. However, as we get older we start to pay attention to the contagious phenomenon, and notice that it is a little more complex than just a sleepy-time mechanism.

Work-it-out

Yawning is an involuntary action that causes the mouth to open wide and breathe in deeply, which actually puts more body parts to work than you may think. When you inhale, you are filling your lungs with air, your abdominal muscles then flex, and your diaphragm is pushed down.

While yawning is associated with drowsiness, your heart-rate actually rises as much as 30 percent during this “exercise” which can be considered a sign of heightened state-of-excitement. If you have ever paid attention during a workout, run or strenuous activity, you might have noticed that you begin to yawn occasionally. It could have been a side-effect of fatigue or the need for rest, but on the contrary, it could have also been a lack of oxygen.

A yawn to the body, is like a radiator to a vehicle. The body induces yawning to provide more oxygen to the brain, and to remove a buildup of carbon dioxide in the lungs by stretching the jaw and increasing blood flow in the neck, face and head. When air is breathed into the mouth, it removes hot blood from the brain and introduces cool air.

So ya caught a case of the yawns…

If you are in a conversation with an individual and he casually yawns, you probably start to wonder if he is bored with the conversation or… oh… here it comes….You yawn as well and fall victim to the contagious yawn, and pretty soon it is like a domino effect on every one that walks by or entertains your conversation.

Studies show that you don’t have to physically see someone yawn for you to yawn back. You can hear or even read about it, and chances are, you have probably yawned at least once since you have been reading this. The contagious yawn is said to be associated with the same part of the brain that deal with empathy, thus linking it to an individuals ability to understand and connect with others’ emotional state. Infectious yawning has been also been observed in chimpanzees and dogs. Speaking of dogs, don’t miss out on your chance to win a queen size mattress! Be sure to enter the Bed Hog Contest by submitting a snapshot of your pooch hogging your bed for a chance to win a free queen-size mattress from Mattresses For Less.

 

What is Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

Are you frequently frustrated at how tired you feel in the morning, regardless of how early you went to sleep the night before? Do you have vague memories of waking briefly in the dead of night short of breath. You may be one of the millions of people world wide that suffer from Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). OSA is a sleep condition that occurs when your airways temporarily closes off while you’re sleeping. When this occurs your airway remains closed until panic signals from your brain cause you to wake or sputter, clearing your airway.

Most often the case is the person suffering from OSA has no recollection of waking the previous night but instead just feels strangely tired. This is due to the multiple times their brain was forced to make them wake throughout the night to keep from suffocating. It is difficult to identify the disorder if you live alone since you typically don’t remember the episodes so it often persists until the person considers they may have a problem.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea is a fairly common disorder that can happen to anyone but there are a few factors that can help cause it. People with a narrow jaw or a large tongue may naturally have a smaller airway which definitely assists in the development of OSA. Also those who suffer from obesity often are diagnosed with OSA since the extra weight on their neck can make it easier for their throats to close as they sleep. Alcohol and other depressants have been know to assist in the development of OSA since they can cause the pallet to relax more than it is supposed to while you sleep.

Although grogginess and lack of a proper nights sleep is a serious issue for anyone as it can effect your mood and your performance during the day, but if OSA persists it can lead to much more serious problems. For instance, because of the continued lack of oxygen as well as the frequent stress signals the brain is forced to put forth, people with OSA are more prone to heart failure and strokes.

If you think you may have OSA, consult you physician immediately and have them perform a sleep study on you to determine the exact cause of your symptoms. If they find you have OSA they will most likely put you on a continuous positive airway pressure  (CPAP) machine that will keep your throat open while you sleep. Once you have your Obstructive Sleep Apnea remedy and you are ready for your first solid nights sleep in a while, make sure you are sleeping on a mattress that will keep you rested the entire night. Mattresses for less has hundreds of the most comfortable mattresses available all available to be delivered to you at your convenience. Make tonight the best nights sleep of your life with a quality mattress from Mattresses for Less!