How to Stop Oversleeping

502023913-smallDo you find yourself getting to work or other commitments late on a daily basis? Is it difficult for you to fall asleep at night, and when you finally do, it’s almost impossible for you to get up in the morning? Oversleeping is a debilitating condition that can cause you to be late, tired and out of step with everyone around you.

The first step in combating oversleeping is to figure out whether you are, in fact, oversleeping or if there is another underlying cause. If, as an adult, you’re sleeping more than 11 hours a night, then it’s likely you’re sleeping too much. This can cause excessive daytime sleepiness and a desire to oversleep. The standard number of hours of sleep an adult should get a night is 6-8.

If you are chronically oversleeping, it is important to see a doctor to determine if there are underlying health problems so they can be removed. Sleep problems can be caused by a wide range of conditions, illnesses and diseases including depression, heart problems and more.

You can change your sleeping pattern by simply going to bed at the same time every night and getting up and the same time every morning. Set an alarm for an early hour, preferably leaving enough time to prepare for the day without being rushed. Eventually, your body will naturally and habitually wake up at this time. Persist with this routine, even if it doesn’t seem like it’s working. It can take your body a while to overcome poor sleeping habits.

It’s important not to just get up in the morning, but to give yourself a reason to get up on time every day. Find something you’d like to be doing and make the time to add it in first thing in the morning, even if this means going to bed earlier each night.

During the day, take a nap if possible. This helps to refresh and energize your body for working in the afternoon. Try to keep the nap to 20 minutes before 3pm though. You don’t want to take away a reason to sleep properly during the night, which can cause a new set of problems.

Set an "Electronic Curfew"

It seems as though getting into bed these days doesn’t necessarily mean it’s time for bed. Rather, as soon as the sheets are pulled back, that’s the time you somehow manage to remember the email you didn’t send, the call that was never made, the text that you have been putting off or perhaps, that’s your designated catch up on the news, tv shows, or social media time. If this is your ritual, chances are, you wake up and the first thing you do, is roll over to check your device for missed calls, emails, and so fourth. Not only is this electronic-obsessed era confirming a social epidemic, but is a leading cause of sleep deprevation for a large percent nationwide.

Somehow these electronic habits have you plugged in when you should be checked out, and appears to be affecting quality slumber time in individuals who are habitual bedtime-gadget-using offenders. The light exposure from a device can disrupt the brains circadian rhythms and censor the release of natural melatonin levels that invite sleep. When you hear, see or read something that may spark excitement, fear or any type of anxiety, your brains engine ignites and its electrical activity increases. Neurons start to race, (which is the exact opposite of what should be happen when you are trying to rest) and reactions ignite to help mobilize the body’s resources, and responds by releasing cortisol creating a stimulation that is nocent to sleep.

Americans are staying up later on a consistent basis which is adjusting their internal clock. In return to this alteration, your body acclimates and physically cannot fall asleep until the “new time”. To prevent this from happening and potentially generating health issues, it is important to set an “electronic curfew” by creating a routine so that your body and mind start to know that each step, is a step closer to bed. Here are a few ideas for your appliance:

  • Get everything ready for the next day, it will put your mind at ease, and you will have a sense of accomplishment before the day has even begun.
  • Ban yourself from anything that will stimulate your brain including computers work, texting, emails, TV, etc.
  • Skip out on the news or anything stressful.
  • If you must watch television, watch reruns of a show, or a movie you have already seen that has a subtle plot.
  • Try a breathing exercise. If pray or meditation isn’t your thing, this is a great way to clear your mind of any lingering, mid-wracking thoughts.

It is amazing what a good nights rest can do for the mind and body. Begin by making small changes to your sleep schedule, and create an inviting bedtime routine to enhance your quality of rest as well your quality of life. To ensure element of sleep, make sure you are sleeping on a mattress that will keep you rested the entire night. At Mattresses For Less, they have a large selection of trusted name brands mattresses that are available to be delivered to you at your convenience. Make tonight the best nights sleep of your life with a quality mattress from Mattresses for Less!